Garland Community Baptist Church
garlandcbc.com
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Weekly Services:


Wednesday-

Bible Study and Prayer- 6:30 pm

(Choir Rehearsal Follows)


Sunday-

Sunday School- (On Break For Summer) 

(All Ages)


Morning Worship- 9:30 am

(Nursery and Jr. Church Available)

 

        (GCBC Youth Group)- 4:00 pm

(Ages 12-17)



Check out the "Events & Ministries" page for                    info on other things taking place at GCBC




STARTING JUNE 14th, WORSHIP SERVICE WILL BE AT 9:30am FOR THE SUMMER MONTHS.





YOUTH GROUP- THE JUNE 28TH OUTING HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO IMPENDING WEATHER.  CHECK OUT THE YOUTH GROUP PAGE FOR MORE INFO!


ON JUNE 28th, GCBC WILL HOST A POT-LUCK SUPPER AND CONCERT FEATURING THE RODGERSONS MUSIC MINISTRY BEGINNING AT 5:30PM.  DOUG RODGERSON AND HIS WIFE BRENDA ARE GOSPEL SINGERS AND DOUG ALSO PLAYS HARMONICA.  THEIR MUSIC IS A MIXTURE OF EASY LISTENING GOSPEL, BLUEGRASS, TRADITIONAL HYMNS AND CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC.  BRING A DISH TO SHARE IF YOU ARE ABLE.






READ THE LATEST NEWSLETTER FROM THE SMITH FAMILY ON THEIR MISSIONS PAGE






  








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We believe in sharing the love of Christ and the way of salvation by serving others as a harbor for the spiritually broken; and becoming a mature family of brothers and sisters through the teachings of the Bible and the work of the Holy Spirit.

Welcome to  

Garland Community Baptist Church


Glad you took the time to stop by.  Whether this is your first time here, or you visit on a regular basis, our prayer is that this will be a place where you can know more about us and about Jesus Christ our Savior.  


If you need prayer, or would like to talk with someone, click on the "Contact Us" tab  and drop me an email.  I will be happy to answer any questions.  You can also write or call using the information below.


God bless! 

Pastor Scott Millett


Connect With Us:  GCBC  P.O. Box 76, Garland, ME  04939  (24 Oliver Hill Road)

                                               (207) 924-6475          gcbc@myfairpoint.net




 

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Some Words Shared May 24th During Morning Worship By A Soldier...

1st Sergeant Arthur Ward, US Army

Memorial Day 2015

Francis Scott Key wrote the “Star Spangled banner in 1814, listen to the final verse:

Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand

Between their loved home and the war’s desolation!

Blest with victory and peace, may the heav’n rescued land

Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation.

Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,

And this be our motto: “In God is our trust.”

And the Star-Spangled Banner in triumph shall wave

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

John 15:12-13 My command is this: Love each other as I have loved you. 13 Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. 

There is no higher expression of love then to give up your very life – to be willing to leave family and friends behind, knowing death is immanent. To the many brave heroes who have gone before, thank you for your sacrifice of love.

We are Soldiers, Airmen, Sailors, Marines and Coast guard men and women that are brothers and sisters with a common bond, that we will defend our country. Although we act with rivalry, we would lay down our lives to protect one another.

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day set aside for remembrance of those who have died in our nation’s service. Memorial Day was first proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan. To honor the 600,000 Union and Confederate soldiers that died during the Civil War. Since the Civil War, more than 500,000 of our military, both women and men, have lost their lives in service to America.

These are words to impel us to remember the cost of our freedom here in America. This is what Memorial Day symbolizes -- a time Americans take a clear look at both our past and our future. One day each year, when we acknowledge the debt we owe to those men and women who -- because they so cherished peace -- chose to serve and defend their country.

Our Military men and women love America, so they spend long years in foreign lands far from her shores. We revere freedom, so we will sacrifice their own that we all may be free. We will defend our right to live as individuals, yet we would yield our individuality in that perhaps most paradoxically of all, we value life, and so bravely ready ourselves to die in the service of our country.

The founders of the United States understood that the military would be key to ensure that our nation remained free.

For more than 239 years our military has provided a bastion against our enemies. In that time, our world has changed and our armed forces have changed with it, but the valor, dignity, and courage of the men and women in uniform remain the same. From Valley Forge, two World wars, a police action to the war on terrorism, the fighting spirit of our American military is a major part of the history of our nation.

So, we choose to remember the past because the payment for forgetfulness is dear -- sacrifice, service, duty ... and many times, injury and death paid by gallant, heroic men and women.

But, what of the soldiers whose life blood has bought the liberty of our nation? They are all different, yet share a sameness that is deeper than the uniform they wear. What is most important -- regardless of race, creed, color or gender -- We are American!

These courageous men and women, each so different in heritage and background, shared the common bonds of the armed forces -- duty and sacrifice. All of them reached a moment in their lives when race and religion, creed and color made no difference. What remained was the essence of America -- the fighting spirit of a proud, valorous people. They are American military who have paid and will continue to pay the price for freedom.

Since the Revolutionary War, more than 42 million men and women have served in America's military.

As a Soldier, we are taught the Army values; Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Self-less Service, Honor, Integrity and Personal Courage. The short stories I am about to tell encompasses all of these values.

 During the Viet-Nam war in July 1969; a five man Marine Recon team was on a night patrol. They were ambushed and came under heavy enemy fire by the NVA in the Khe Sanh valley. The patrol had 1 KIA and all 4 of the other Marines were wounded. The Recon team was led by Marine SSG Hunt.  Although being wounded himself he called in artillery support and for emergency extraction by an army helicopter. He then carried a wounded Marine to safety; the 3 wounded Marines and the SSG Hunt survived of that attack. He was awarded the Marine Corp Cross for Gallantry and a Purple Heart for his heroic actions that day. His name is SGT Major Sam Hunt, Marlene’s brother that served 3 tours in Viet-Nam.

October 1993 an Army helicopter crashed in the middle of a dense maze of shacks and shanties in Mogadishu, Somalia. A growing number of enemy troops were closing in on the site where four critically wounded soldiers were trapped in the wreckage. Master Sergeant Gordon and Sergeant First Class Shughart volunteered to go to the aid of their fallen comrades. Both were told that rescue would not be coming immediately. They were subjected to intense fire from automatic weapons and rocket- propelled grenades, as they fought their way through the narrow streets to the crash site. They stayed and defended the down aircrew until their ammunition was exhausted. After Sergeant Shughart was killed, Master Sergeant Gordon took a rifle from the debris, handed it to an injured pilot, wished him "Good luck," and continued to fight until he, himself, was fatally wounded. Both Soldiers received the Medal of Honor posthumously for their heroic actions.

In Iraq in September 2003, a Medevac helicopter was called in for an urgent extraction. A soldier riding in a convoy truck turret fell and fractured his C1 vertebrae. The convoy was under a major power transmission line. The helicopter had to land 100 yards away. Both crewmen, the flight medic and crew chief had to leave the safety of the aircraft and walk to the accident site. There were locals gathering to observe what was going on. The crew has only light weapons to protect themselves. The crewmen were able to extract the Soldier and carry him back to the aircraft. The helicopter made a quick flight to Kuwait city. The Soldier made a full recovery and was able to walk again thanks to the actions taken by the aircrew on that day. The crewman was myself and SFC Mark Urquhart. Both Soldiers were awarded the Air Medal for their actions in SWA.

The Marines and Soldiers in these three stories all have ties the great state of Maine like many of our veterans that have gone before us.

As we remember these brave warriors and their comrades in arms on this Memorial Day, we must look to the future as well as the past. In today's world, freedom comes cloaked in uncertainty. America still relies on her sons and daughters to defend her liberty. The cost of independence remains high, but we are willing to pay it. We do not pay it gladly, but we pay it with deep reverence and thanks to those who have sacrificed their lives for America. We know that in the years to come, more brave souls will sacrifice their lives for America. 



Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Tomb Guards are handpicked and rigorously trained. The duty at the Tomb is not for everyone, with the majority of soldiers who begin Tomb Guard training fails. Tomb Guards describe their service as a privilege and an honor, and are undeniably proud of their service. They are part of an unbroken chain of soldiers dating back to 1926.

Tomb Guards are part of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment "The Old Guard". The Old Guard is the oldest active infantry unit in the military, in service to the U.S. since 1784.

To become a Tomb Guard, an Old Guard soldier must volunteer by applying for appointment to the Tomb through the Sergeant of the Guard. To be considered for an appointment, the soldier must be highly motivated and disciplined, and possess a strong military bearing and soldierly appearance.

Elite Soldiers

Besides the requirement for excellent physical condition, the soldiers go through a rigorous interview and two-week trial to become a tomb guard. Members of the tomb guard must have a military record free of blemishes from such issues as disciplinary problems, drunkenness, drugs or any kind of negative behavior. Tomb guards are those who have personal drive and self-discipline. These soldiers maintain high standards, and they must have the physical stamina for a constant watch at the Tomb, which is guarded 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, in rain, snow or shine.

Trial Period

While undergoing the two-week trial phase to see if the individual is a good fit to guard the Tomb of the Unknown Solider, each soldier must memorize the Arlington National Cemetery history, which consists of seven pages of information. Guards must be able to repeat all seven pages of history word-for-word to earn a walk -- a ceremonial ritual involving specific steps and movements that occur during the changing of the guard. These walks consist of an hour in the winter and at night and a half-hour in the summer.

Training and Testing

After passing the two-week trial, new guard training starts, which lasts 6 to 12 months and includes five grueling and progressive tests. During training, would-be guards learn to maintain their uniforms and weapons to the unit's standards; they learn the steps, cadence and ceremonial processes of the guard-change ritual. After passing the tests and reciting 35 pages of historical information error-free, Tomb Guards receive the least-awarded badge in U.S. Army history, and the second lowest military badge overall: the Tomb Guard Identification Badge. If sentinels fail any part of the training, they are sent back to their company.

 

 




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Search me, O God, and know my heart; try me, and know my anxieties; and see if there is any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.

   

                              Psalm 139:23-24 (nkjv)